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Nneka’s Story

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Nneka’s Story

By Rolan Gulston

Like many girls her age, twelve-year-old Nneka Useni from Addington Primary School loves spending time with her friends, reading, learning new recipes, taking selfies, and playing her favourite sport – netball, especially with her teammates on the CAST netball team. Over the years, CAST has developed a strong partnership with the school, facilitating early literacy programmes for the foundation-level, and sport and youth development programmes for the pre-teen age group.

Earlier this year, Nneka was one of 60 girls selected to attend the CAST Girls’ Camp, a 3-day retreat for the young ladies to learn about what it means to be resilient; mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. “I learnt so much in just one weekend and felt so spoilt, I was smiling the whole time,” Nneka reminisces.  She especially enjoyed the team-building exercises, which challenged the girls in their ability to problem-solve and find solutions together.

The camp, she feels, has greatly impacted her life in helping her to develop a stronger relationship with God.

“Before, I always felt like the whole world was coming for me. I didn’t trust people, but now I know that people care about me and that the bad things will make me stronger.”

Nneka attends the Christ Embassy Church at China Mall in the Durban CBD, and has also joined the teen youth group, which gives her the space to talk about evangelism, freely express her views, and pray for others, which she found difficult to do before.

Growing up as the only girl at home since her mother’s passing in 2010, Nneka finds it difficult to connect with her older brother attending high school, and her father, who seldom gets to spend quality time with them because of work. The family are currently under tremendous financial strain, living on a social grant from SASSA, but unable to afford electricity for the past 3 months.

Despite this, Nneka has learnt to face these challenges with a positive attitude, displaying maturity and confidence far beyond her years. Having been a learner at the school since Grade One, Nneka has become a leader in her own rite, taking on the duties of library and drama monitor, as well as MC’ing the school’s recent Heritage Day celebration concert.

Nneka’s dream is to become an entrepreneur in the fashion industry. She will be attending high school at Durban Girls’ Secondary from next year, and intends on keeping up her good academic, and behavioural record. Fortunately, she has had the encouragement of her teachers to speak up and work hard toward her goals. She has also greatly appreciated the support from Thandi, CAST’s Girls’ Sport Co-ordinator, in her approach to coaching. “Thandi’s fair, she takes the time to listen to us. It’s easy to open up to her,” she says. This has also helped Nneka to form a strong bond with her teammates, and learn the value of teamwork.

Nneka’s journey through her childhood years at Addington Primary School has been greatly enriched by the time and resources provided by CAST through the generosity of our sponsors and volunteers. If you would like to get involved in shaping young lives through the Girls’ Sport and Youth Development programmes run by CAST, contact Thandi on 031 266 8830 or thandi@cast.org.za

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Living Art: Malusi’s Story

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Growing up in the rural community of Bergville, Malusi Manzini’s passion for artwork, creativity and recycling began with creating one model of a rural home out of cardboard.  At first, Malusi did not plan on using his God-given talent in creative arts. However, with a family of four brothers and two sisters and no one working at home, he managed to use his creativity to support his family.  Malusi made more artwork out of the materials he could find, such as plastic materials and cardboard, and sold them to raise income each month.

After matriculating, Malusi moved to Chesterville in 2012 to live with his brother, and was able to study Social Work at UNISA.   He continued to create artwork as he completed his Social Work practical in the community.

“After moving away from a rural area towards the city of Durban, I was so fascinated by the kind of lifestyle lived here. I could easily draw the difference in the type of infrastructure found here in the city with the ones in the rural areas, I was so motivated by this difference that I even decided to take a picture of one of the houses and tried to build it into a smaller scale using cardboard as part of recycling.”

During this time, he met Nomakaya Mpambaniso, CAST’s Chesterville Community Co-ordinator, who took an interest in his artwork.  Nomakaya encouraged Malusi to showcase his artwork at West City Fellowship (WCF) in Chesterville, and she also connected Malusi with CAST’s Youth Development Programme.

Excited about the opportunity, Malusi joined CAST as a volunteer soccer coach working with 23 boys between the ages of 13-15 years old.  However, he envisioned the programme to go beyond just sports.  Malusi realised that some of the boys showed artistic potential, so he developed a formal Creative Arts Programme.

The boys use recycled plastic materials and cardboard to create their artwork.  CAST and WCF also support Malusi’s programme by donating materials such as brushes, paint, scissors and glue.

“I like to work with the younger boys and share stories.  I tell them to try to be creative, try to make your own things.  Don’t depend on your parents.  I encourage the boys to finish matric and go to university.”

Malusi and his boys are looking forward to attending the upcoming CAST boys2Men Camp in October.  Although Malusi has not attended the camp previously, he believes this will be a good opportunity for his boys to develop values such as respect and self-determination, while also spending quality time with peers to share ideas and support each other in learning how to become strong men.

In the past month, ten boys from Malusi’s programme have raised the necessary funds (R200/$15 per boy) to attend camp.  CAST still needs to raise another R350/$27 per boy to cover the entire cost of 60 boys attending camp.  This is a unique opportunity for the boys to experience life outside of their community, grow in their walk with the Lord and learn more about what it means to become a man.  If you are interested in sponsoring one of Malusi’s boys to go to boys2Men camp or donating art supplies for the Creative Arts Programme, please contact George at: george@cast.org.za or 079 596 7364

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CAST at Daleview High Tea: Grace, Glamour & Grit

CAST at Daleview High Tea: Grace, Glamour & Grit

By Cindy Whittle

“The world will never realise 100 per cent of its goals if 50 per cent of its people cannot realise their full potential. When we unleash the power of women, we can secure the future for all.”  UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

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Youth empowerment through resilience training is one of four focus areas of community development at the Church Alliance for Social Transformation (CAST). This, together with her passion for advocacy in the subject of gender equality, is one of the reasons why CAST’s General Manager, Charmaine Moses, jumped at the opportunity to address the young ladies at Daleview High School accompanied by CAST staff members, Cindy Whittle and Noeleen Moonsamy. On the 18th of August, Daleview held their annual High Tea.  Having spent the first five years of her teaching career at the school, Mrs. Moses felt at home, challenging the girls on what it means to be ‘3G-compliant’ and even better, ‘4G-compliant’.

“Girls, you’ve got to have Grace, Glamour and Grit to achieve your goals – the ‘3G’s”, elaborated Mrs. Moses, as the girls listened intently.

Mrs. Whittle also took the opportunity to share her personal story, a testament to the role that grit has played in helping her to overcome challenges she has faced in her life. “Having grit means digging deep and pressing on when things are really hard”, she conveyed.

In closing, Charmaine boldly asked the girls, “What could be better than ‘3G’?”, answered by a resounding “4G!” Mrs. Moses excitedly shared what the addition of the 4th and most important ‘G’, God, has made to her life.

“With God the other ‘3G’s are fast-tracked” she said. “Grace, glam and grit is made possible with God in our lives. Even true glamour comes from within.”

The girls were presented with a “Certificate of Attendance” for their first ‘4G’ course and gifted with small tokens representing female empowerment, followed by tea and treats. CAST in partnership with Cornerstone Community Church (Longbury Drive, Phoenix) looks forward to building on the lessons shared in this first session with the young ladies at Daleview High School that may foster a culture of spiritual and emotional resilience for our leaders of tomorrow.

To learn more about CAST’s impact in Phoenix, contact Daniel Moses at: mosesdaniel20@gmail.com or 071 364 4860

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Siyanqoba: Girls’ Camp 2017

Siyanqoba Girls’ Camp 2017: “We are more than conquerors”

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This year, CAST will be hosting its second girls’ camp. Building on the success of the first camp, we hope to help the girls gain an understanding of resilience. The purpose of the camp is to equip girls with practical skills to build their physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and intellectual or cognitive resilience in the face of adversity. The camp also offers the girls a safe space for authentic engagement that will allow them to have fun, be brave, and feel safe enough to be vulnerable.

Here’s what you need to know about the camp:

When: 30 June – 02 July 2017

Where: Camp Noah (Richmond)

Who: 60 young girls (ages 13-18) selected from the CAST youth programmes run in local communities

Cost: The girls will raise R200 individually & CAST will sponsor R350 for each girl

How you can get involved:

  • Sponsor a girl to attend camp (R350 or $27).  You can donate via EFT or online at: https://www.givengain.com/cause/4933/campaigns/17462/
  • Donate materials: gift packets, A5 note books, bibles, pens.
  • Donate food items: popcorn, Marie biscuits, marshmallows, hot chocolate, hot dog rolls, chicken viennas, margarine, tomato sauce, sweets, juice, salt & Aromat.
  • Donate other items: board games, puzzles.

For more information contact Thandi Gova at: thandi@cast.org.za or 072 037 0884

CAST is a registered non-profit: 085-077 NPO. Donations are deductible in term of Section 18A of the Income Tax Act.

Bank Details:  CAST Trust, Nedbank, Westville Mall/138 026, No: 101 7717 672

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Njabulo

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Originally from Johannesburg, Njabulo is an 18 years old who is passionate about cars, science and sport.  Njabulo and his grandfather have lived in KwaDabeka since 2011.  They moved to Durban in order to be closer to family after his grandfather lost his leg in a serious accident.

In Johannesburg Njabulo played for the Blue Bulls Junior Rugby team and loved athletics.  However in KwaDabeka the rugby teams were too far away to join.  Wanting to try a new sport, Njabulo went to KwaDabeka Baptist Church in 2014 to find out if he could train with the CAST basketball team (aka the Clan).  After meeting with the coach and filling out a few forms, Njabulo officially joined the Clan.

“The Clan welcomed me with a warm heart.  I didn’t feel different.  They let me fit in like a puzzle piece.

From the Clan, I’ve learned about being a unit and helping others to succeed.  We help each other with homework and basketball.

CAST has also taught me how to discipline myself, and helped me to realise who I want to become.”

It was through a conversation with the Clan about cars and carbon dioxide emissions that Njabulo realised he wanted to study engineering, or something related in the science field.  His dream is to one day create his own hydrolic engine.  However his first passion is to study electronics.

As Njabulo explains, “A good scientist first sees a problem, then creates a solution.”

George Mwaura, CAST’s Youth Development Head of Department, was able to connect Njabulo with an opportunity to take a sponsored Electronic Technician diploma course at Intec College.  Njabulo is excited for the opportunity to learn more about electronics.

However, to be able to fully utilise the opportunity, Njabulo needs a used working desktop computer or laptop. CAST believes in empowering resilient youth like Njabulo, who are passionate about achieving their dreams.  If you would like to donate a computer or laptop, contact George Mwaura at: george@cast.org.za or 079 596 7364

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Soccer Boots for All

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Everyone loves buying a new pair of shoes!  In fact, just trying on new shoes can make your day better.

Last month the youth involved with CAST’s soccer teams in Noodsberg and Chibini received their own brand new shoes and socks.  For some of them it was their very first pair of new soccer boots.  CAST was only able to provide this gift through a generous donation from Community Chest.

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Over the last five years, CAST has seen a tremendous growth in the amount of youth involved with our rural soccer teams.  Our biggest challenge has been to provide the teams with soccer boots.  In the past, we relied on second hand donated shoes which were a challenge to find, and therefore most of the players didn’t have proper soccer boots, or played with no boots at all. The majority of the participants come from poor households and could not raise R600 ($44) for a new pair of soccer boots that would actually last more than just a few months.

The teenagers we work with oftentimes have low self-esteem. We have noticed whenever we attend games, coming from a poor community, most players feel embarrassed wearing worn out shoes.  The new soccer boots have boosted their self-esteem as they are able to play comfortably and with pride.  Also, the new soccer boots protect players’ feet from being injured by thorns in the ground.

In CAST’s Youth Development Programme, we believe in empowering youth to become resilient, so they are able to overcome challenges and provide solutions in their own communities.  By building the self-esteem of youth, they are able to stand up and make a positive impact in their communities.

To find out more about how you can impact the life of a young person through CAST, please contact George Mwaura at: george@cast.org.za

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Spinach & Soccer

 

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Rain or shine, you won’t find Sibu sitting in his house.

A typical day for Sibu starts with tending his farm: cabbage, spinach, green pepper, mealies and green beans.  By noon he is finished and ready to help out in his community.  Between attending Noodsberg Baptist Church, coaching CAST’s Noodsberg soccer team, participating in CAST’s Business Forum and teaching community members how to farm, Sibu keeps busy.

Sibu first started giving back to his community by coaching soccer.  He noticed that the boys did not have a coach – you can read the full story here.

But as Sibu explains,”The aim is not about soccer, it’s about the church.”

It was at boys2Men camp last year that Sibu came to know Jesus, which changed his life forever.  Now Sibu wants his boys on the soccer team to also experience the same transformation.

That’s why he has the team pray when they finish playing, and makes sure that the boys are in church on Sundays and Wednesdays.

It’s why he visits the boys at home, connecting with their families and getting to know the challenges they face.

It’s why he teaches the boys how to farm, and gives them a chance to get work experience.

As a ‘big brother’, Sibu walks alongside his boys, preparing them for adulthood.  He encourages them to stay in Noodsberg, because he knows the importance of having positive role models for the younger children.

More recently, Sibu has been involved with CAST’s Business Forum in Noodsberg.  After 3 months he became a Paradigm Shift trainer, as he found more and more people approaching him to learn about farming.

This month Sibu decided to raise money for home gardens in Noodsberg by selling seedlings.  In a matter of just a few minutes, he raised R150.

Sibu explains his motivation for this project, “I want people not to ask me for food, but to grow their own food – that’s why I am selling seedlings.”

Volunteers like Sibu, who are passionate about their communities, are vital to sustainable community development in the areas where CAST works.  Sibu is using simple opportunities like farming spinach and coaching soccer to transform his community for the Kingdom of God.  If you would like to know more about how you can become a CAST volunteer like Sibu, email volunteers@cast.org.za to find out more information.